I think it would be helpful if people who posted videos told what app they used to create their videos. What do people find most easily useable? I have used Photo Story and really like it; what should I try next?

Thanks!

Shari Shaw

Views: 5

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Hi Shari.
Have a look at CogDogRoo Story Tools
http://cogdogroo.wikispaces.com/StoryTools
The author of the CogDogRoo site, Alan Levine used one story and tried to develop it 60 times using more than 60 separate tools. He has created a short review of each tool with links to his products. Often he included additional samples of how the tool was used by others, as well.

If you feel like listening to him talk about this initiative, you can get the video at http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/881271.
He's in Iceland speaking to an educational technology class in Canada.

Margaret
I'd be happy to share what I know about making videos. I don't use fancy equipment. A basic Canon video camera; I make sure to have two separate audio tracks to ensure that one works well; the editing is done on Final Cut Pro. The online encoding is done with high-end encoding software because we want the movies to be accessible in schools -- but I just uploaded here a .mov file. (On TeachingBooks, we make them .flv files and put them within a player that we made.)

I've attached a picture of all the technology I use when going to film authors in their homes or on remote locations. Nothing fancy or too expensive.

If I can ever guide someone on production of mini-documentaries (which is what I feel I make all the time for TeachingBooks), I'd be delighted. The book trailer I uploaded, though, was an oddity that I made for the book to put on YouTube. Just playing....

Cheers. Nick Glass
Attachments:
I am having students use animoto for their booktalks. Easy to use and nice video effects.
Thanks for the links. This is great!

Nancy
Great topic. I want to start learning about and trying different options. Right now, tho, I use VoiceThread, and find it very easy. You can see examples at my booktalk blog: http://linderobooks.blogspot.com. If you like this concept, I can share more about how I do them. Jane
Wow! I'm nowhere near that! You inspire me, Nick. Thanks for the excellent photo of your equipment. I'm hoping to spend Christmas break learning some new stuff!

Thanks again,

Shari

Nick Glass said:
I'd be happy to share what I know about making videos. I don't use fancy equipment. A basic Canon video camera; I make sure to have two separate audio tracks to ensure that one works well; the editing is done on Final Cut Pro. The online encoding is done with high-end encoding software because we want the movies to be accessible in schools -- but I just uploaded here a .mov file. (On TeachingBooks, we make them .flv files and put them within a player that we made.)

I've attached a picture of all the technology I use when going to film authors in their homes or on remote locations. Nothing fancy or too expensive.

If I can ever guide someone on production of mini-documentaries (which is what I feel I make all the time for TeachingBooks), I'd be delighted. The book trailer I uploaded, though, was an oddity that I made for the book to put on YouTube. Just playing....

Cheers. Nick Glass
It's a goldmine! Thanks Margaret!

Shari

Margaret Stimson said:
Hi Shari.
Have a look at CogDogRoo Story Tools
http://cogdogroo.wikispaces.com/StoryTools
The author of the CogDogRoo site, Alan Levine used one story and tried to develop it 60 times using more than 60 separate tools. He has created a short review of each tool with links to his products. Often he included additional samples of how the tool was used by others, as well.

If you feel like listening to him talk about this initiative, you can get the video at http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/881271.
He's in Iceland speaking to an educational technology class in Canada.

Margaret
There are several online applications for which there is no learning curve whatsoever. Try these out:

RockYou
Slide.com
Animoto
BubbleShare
Nancy Keane said:
I am having students use animoto for their booktalks. Easy to use and nice video effects.

Nancy, Can we see some examples of your students' animoto booktalks?
Janethelibrarian said:
Great topic. I want to start learning about and trying different options. Right now, tho, I use VoiceThread, and find it very easy. You can see examples at my booktalk blog: http://linderobooks.blogspot.com. If you like this concept, I can share more about how I do them. Jane

Jane, I love the voicethread booktalks your students have made. I didn't know you could embed voicethreads. I will show these to my students. Thank you for sharing.
Thanks for these great ideas! I'm looking to start using videos next school year and this will get me off and running. I've used animoto and slide.com before and can also say they are great.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Top Children's Books

BookPodcasts

Some portals for book-related podcasts:
Bookwink (for younger students)
Booktalks Quick and Simple (Nancy Keane's huge number of booktalks)
Nancy Pearl's Book Reviews
Wired for Books
Orange County Library System (FL) (podcast booktalks, stories, battle of the books, more!)
NYT Book Review Podcast archive
Readers Circle Booktalks (Pike School)
Hopkinton High/Middle Schools
Runkle School Book Reviews
SimonSays Podcasts from Simon and Schuster
Just One More Book (for little ones)
Scholastic Booktalks
Springfield Middle School ClassicCast
Lifelong Literacy Public Awareness CampaignLOC
Classictastic

© 2017   Created by Joyce Valenza.   Powered by

Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service